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energy markets. the obama administration has said the study will be central to the decision on whether to export. he said exporting the gas would be a bigger impact on the economy. >> slap in the face of dow chemical. of coke, not coke the beverage company. but this was something that was hotly disputed within the romney campaign. he really let this stuff go because the romney campaign had some very big givers that were chemical companies. >> do we know, say, very bad, how much will prices conceivableably go up if we become an exporter of natural gas? is it that great a difference? >> we burn offer more natural gas than we use. burn off, in other words literally, you see those flames, we flare more than we use. so we got a real excess of this stuff. >> the government says that the -- 6.6% of current u.s. consumption. >> why would prices move that dramatically at all? wouldn't they just come down globally? >> the average, our $16 goes to $4. it costs $7 to get stuff from the united states. >> you should argue that they should go down because they went be the only one. dominion has brooi
at the latest report from the international energy agency which may have more of an impact where oil prices are going in this session. they're looking for slightly demand in 2013. and they're pointing to china for the reason. we're anticipating we'll get the report from the energy department at 10:30 a.m. on oil supplies. the expectation is for a slight decline in food supplies. but we did see a major build in the industry report, if that is confirmed we could see these gains short-lived. back to you. >> all right. thank you very much, sharon epperson. we've got a little extra from jamie dimon. but before we get to that -- >> a quick talker on urban outfitters. this morning "usa today" had their new holiday catalog which features a bunch of profane products. there is, for instance, a photo album that says -- basically uses the "f" bomb, drops the "f" bomb and said it was blanking awesome. a candle that spellings ospells out the "f" worth in black. and let's reminisce. a lot of discussion -- one marketing expert said it's brilliant, explosive, short-term marketing that generates buzz. it's t
markets, energy, and medical. it has already caused this uncertainty, roadw uncertainty, a reduction in the amount of work we're doing, and it's prevented us from hiring in some of our plants. >> you're holding back, then. you're holding back on hiring, waiting to see how this thing plays itself out. presuming they don't go over the cliff, they come to some agreement, does that mean you would hire more workers? >> right now it's very frustrating that we don't have issues decided here. so, yes, we have plants that can be ramping up to supply in the defense industry. until we know with certainty what's going to happen with the cuts, we're not going to be hiring in those plants. >> we're going to bring in now howard dean, who i believe is joining us. thank you for joining us. i hope that you've also been listening to what dawn had to say. she's been basically saying it would hurt her company. it's already affecting her hiring decisions. it would hurt the defense industry as well. so why do you feel that going over the fiscal cliff would be good? >> we have an enormous deficit problem in
happening. cheap to build things here. it's energy costs so much lower than around the world. labor costs -- look at these labor rates. people are not working for much more money. there is slack in the system. it's a developing story. >> tim cook in yesterday's interview on rockcenter said it's the lack of manufacturing skills. they have to look overseas to manufacture their products. i thought that was interesting. there's a notion here in the united states that it's always about cheap labor. cheap labor. that's why you go to china. not necessarily entirely the case. >> a lot of manufacturing jobs require a certain amount of math skill now that was not required 20 or 30 years ago. unfortunately we hear time and again from chief executives, they have hard time filling those fairly high level manufacturing jobs, high skill required manufacturing jobs. >> this is what ceo of general electric stressed in the jobs council for the president, listen up, mr. president. junior colleges is where you can make a difference. >> vocational skills. >> i don't feel it's -- look, washington is focused on
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4